HEALTH

Amino acids in children – which of them are needed for proper development

The child’s body is intensively developing, and therefore it has enormous needs for nutrients, the lack of which can lead to serious disorders. So, for the first year of life the weight of the child triples, the maturation of the immune, nervous and other body systemstakes place. In this regard, along with a reduction in physical strength, functional disorders, severe mental disorders can be observed, which it is not always possible to make up for when replenishing the existing deficit. An example is kwashiorkor, a disease that develops as a result of the deficiency of amino acids in the diet, in this case ascites and severe dystrophy are observed. In most cases, this disease develops in children from poor regions of Africa as a result of regular food supply containing few proteins.

Breastfeeding, in most cases, allows you to meet the plastic and metabolic needs of the body in the first six months of life, but later the introduction of complementary foods in addition to mother’s milk is necessary. The child additionally needsto get easily digestible, full of vitamins food. As part of food proteins there are 20 amino acids, and among them there are essential, the lack of which the body can not make up for itself, by synthesis. Due to that fact their intake is required when feeding. Essential amino acids for children include:

  • Tryptophan – normally is required 22 mg per 1 kg of body weight per day (with a deficiency, severe muscle atrophy develops, growth slows down);
  • Lysine – normally is required 150 mg per 1 kg of body weight per day (necessary for normal growth and the functioning of the hematopoietic system);
  • Methionine – normally, 70 mg per 1 kg of body weight per day is required (to ensure detoxification of the liver, the work of the nervous system, takes an active part in the metabolism of fats and phospholipids);
  • Valine – normally, the daily requirement is 93 mg per 1 kg of body weight per day (with a deficiency, it affects the psyche, reducing serotonin levels);
  • Threonine – in the norm, 60 mg per 1 kg of body weight per day is required (with its lack, there is a slowing of metabolic processes, which is accompanied by lethargy, weakness, drowsiness);
  • Leucine – normally150 mg per 1 kg of body weight per dayis required(with its lack in infants, the metabolism of carbohydrates deteriorates, which is accompanied by hypoglycemia);
  • Isoleucine – normally 90 mg per 1 kg of body weight per day is enough (with its deficit there is an imbalance in the thyroid gland work, it is difficult to remove ammonia from the body, which can cause severe poisoning);
  • Phenylalanine – normally90 mg per 1 kg of body weight per dayis required(for the thyroid and adrenal glands work in the child);
  • Histidine – normally 32 mg per 1 kg of body weight per day is required (influences hematopoiesis).